Hunting, Angling & Nature Appreciation in Schools

Summary

In an effort to improve the quality of young people’s lives, several states have introduced or passed legislation to require some form of educational opportunity for hunting, fishing and nature appreciation as part of a student’s elective academic curriculum. These programs aim to connect students with the natural world and can play an important role in addressing public health concerns associated with sedentary behavior and obesity.

Introduction

The upward trend of obesity rates in America, especially among youth, is an alarming issue.  The health problems associated with poor dietary choices and absence of physical activity is a growing concern among both physicians and lawmakers. In recent years, children have elected to spend more of their free time in front of the television instead of in the outdoors enjoying the time honored traditions of hunting and angling. In some cases, this can contribute to a decline in the number of hunting and fishing licenses issued each year. In an effort to improve the quality of young people’s lives, several states have introduced legislation to require hunting, angling and nature appreciation in schools. This legislation can provide programs that institute hunting and angling education courses as part of the student’s elective academic curriculum. These programs are founded on the notion that instruction in hunting, angling, and/or nature appreciation can restore a desire for young boys and girls to spend more time being active in the outdoors and provide a boost in the physical health of our nation’s youth. 

Points of Interest

  • In 2014, Virginia Legislative Sportsmen’s Caucus Co-Chair, Delegate Scott Lingamfelter, introduced H 307, which was later signed into law. H 307 permits local school boards to allow Hunter Education courses as an after school program for students in grades 7-12.
  • In 2010, the Michigan Legislature approved House Resolution 200 to express support of public policies that promote outdoor activities for Michigan's children.
  • A lack of routine contact with nature may result in stunted academic and developmental growth. This unwanted side-effect of the electronic age is called Nature Deficit Disorder (NDD). The term was coined by author Richard Louv in his book Last Child in the Woods. To learn more about Last Child in the Woods please reference: http://richardlouv.com/.
  • Additionally, some states have Departments that provide resources for teachers on how to incorporate outdoor educational programs into their curriculums. 

 

Language

The following states have enacted hunting, angling, and nature appreciation in schools legislation using the language below:

  • Colorado §24-33-109.5: “There is hereby created in the office of the executive director the Colorado Kids Outdoors grant program to fund opportunities for Colorado youth to participate in outdoor activities in the state, including but not limited to programs that emphasize the environment and experiential, field-based learning.”
  • West Virginia §18-2-8a: “The orientation program shall be offered over a two-week period during the school year and shall deal with the protection of lives and property against loss or damage as a result of improper use of firearms. The orientation program shall also include instruction about the proper use of firearms in hunting, sport competition and care and safety of firearms in the home and may utilize materials prepared by any national nonprofit membership organization which has as one of its purposes the training of people in marksmanship and the safe handling and use of firearms.”
  • Virginia §22.1-204.2: “Local school boards may provide after-school hunter safety education programs for students in the school division in grades seven through 12. Each student shall bear the cost of participating in such programs…”
  • New Mexico HJM 3: “Be it resolved by the legislature of the state of New Mexico that the importance of environmental education that contributes to the education, health and responsible behavior of New Mexicans be affirmed by the legislature; and be it further resolved that the governor be requested to declare a week in April ‘Environmental Education Week’ and to encourage all kindergarten through twelfth grade teachers to teach their students outdoors for at least one hour that week and encourage state agencies to celebrate environmental education through existing programs…

Moving Forward

State legislatures should consider introducing legislation that offers hunting, angling, and nature appreciation in schools, or to offer a hunter’s education elective course. These programs work to recruit new hunters and anglers – something that will ultimately benefit the individual student and state conservation efforts because of the license fees and tax-generated monies.

Contact

For more information regarding this issue, please contact:
Andy Treharne (303) 789-7589; andy@sportsmenslink.org

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